History

 

 


 

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E.g., 2016-12-10
E.g., 2016-12-10
E.g., 2016-12-10
Dec 12th 2016

This course examines how the idea of "the modern" develops at the end of the 18th century in European philosophy and literature, and how being modern (or progressive, or hip) became one of the crucial criteria for understanding and evaluating cultural change. Are we still in modernity, or have we moved beyond the modern to the postmodern?

Average: 3.5 (6 votes)
Dec 12th 2016

Learn about the history of the Middle East for a deeper understanding of current regional developments! This course will discuss the developments in the Middle East from the early 20th century to the present.

Average: 5.5 (2 votes)
Dec 12th 2016

This course is a short taster on the topic of the use of Images, Film, and their use in historical interpretation in the 20th century. It is primarily provided for those who have a general interest in history that draws on photojournalism as primary evidence, and films based on historical events.

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Dec 5th 2016

This course, part 1 of a 2-course sequence, examines the history of rock, primarily as it unfolded in the United States, from the days before rock (pre-1955) to the end of the 1960s. This course covers the music of Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, Phil Spector, Bob Dylan, the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Jimi Hendrix, Cream, and many more artists, with an emphasis both on cultural context and on the music itself. We will also explore how developments in the music business and in technology helped shape the ways in which styles developed.

Average: 9 (4 votes)
Dec 5th 2016

This course, part 2 of a 2-course sequence, examines the history of rock, primarily as it unfolded in the United States, from the early 1970s to the early 1990s. This course covers the music of Led Zeppelin, the Allman Brothers, Carole King, Bob Marley, the Sex Pistols, Donna Summer, Michael Jackson, Madonna, Prince, Metallica, Run-DMC, and Nirvana, and many more artists, with an emphasis both on cultural context and on the music itself. We will also explore how developments in the music business and in technology helped shape the ways in which styles developed.

Average: 10 (3 votes)
Nov 28th 2016

The Holocaust: The Destruction of European Jewry is an adaptation of an on-campus course that has been co-taught by Murray Baumgarten, Distinguished Professor of English and Comparative Literature (Literature Department), and Peter Kenez, Professor Emeritus (History Department), for over 20 years at UC Santa Cruz. In this course, you will explore the Holocaust from the overlapping perspectives of literature and history—through memoirs, historical documents, poetry, documentary footage, filmic representations, and novels.

Average: 9.7 (3 votes)
Nov 28th 2016

This is a survey of ancient Greek history from the Bronze Age to the death of Socrates in 399 BCE. Along with studying the most important events and personalities, we will consider broader issues such as political and cultural values and methods of historical interpretation.

Average: 6.7 (3 votes)
Nov 28th 2016

How did the State of Israel come to be? How is it that an idea, introduced in 19th century Europe, became a reality? And how does that reality prevail in the harsh complexities of the Middle East? Presented by Professor Eyal Naveh, with additional units from Professor Asher Sussers' "The Emergence of the Modern Middle East" course, This course will take you on a journey through the history of Modern Israel.

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Nov 28th 2016

This course will discuss the emergence of the modern Middle East from the fall of the Ottoman Empire, at the end of the First World War to the present. It will discuss the Ottoman legacy in the region and the Western imperial impact on the creation of the Arab state system.

Average: 5.5 (6 votes)
Nov 28th 2016

The destruction of the First Temple in Jerusalem and the Babylonian Exile were a great catastrophe in the history of the Jewish Nation.
What really happened during that dark, fateful age, and how did new opportunities arise from the ashes?

Average: 5 (2 votes)
Nov 21st 2016

This is a survey of modern history from a global perspective. Part One begins with the political and economic revolutions of the late 1700s and tracks the transformation of the world during the 1800s. Part One concludes as these bewildering changes seem to be running beyond the capacity of older institutions to handle them. Throughout the course we try to grasp what is happening and ask: Why? And the answers often turn on very human choices.

Average: 3.6 (8 votes)
Nov 21st 2016

This course provides an overview of Thomas Jefferson's work and perspectives presented by the University of Virginia in partnership with Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello. Together, UVA and Monticello are recognized internationally as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Average: 5.5 (2 votes)
Nov 21st 2016

This is a survey of modern history from a global perspective. Part Two begins early in the twentieth century, as older ways of doing things and habits of thought give way. What follows is an era of cataclysmic struggles over what ideas and institutions will take their place.

Average: 5.7 (9 votes)
Nov 7th 2016

Change the way you see World War 1 as you explore stories of hope, suffering and loss from newly released historical archives.

Average: 7.5 (4 votes)
Nov 7th 2016

Explore the archaeology of the most heavily fortified frontier in the Roman Empire, its people and their lives.

Average: 7.4 (7 votes)
Oct 31st 2016

Colossal pyramids, imposing temples, golden treasures, enigmatic hieroglyphs, powerful pharaohs, strange gods, and mysterious mummies are features of Ancient Egyptian culture that have fascinated people over the millennia. The Bible refers to its gods, rulers, and pyramids. Neighboring cultures in the ancient Near East and Mediterranean wrote about its god-like kings and its seemingly endless supply of gold. The Greeks and Romans describe aspects of Egypt's culture and history.

Average: 10 (1 vote)
Oct 31st 2016

Explore the lives of men, women and children living through war and revolution and social changes that made modern Ireland. How do people experience war and revolution? How does political change, violence, total war, affect life in its most basic ways? Looking at Ireland through war and revolution, this course considers these and other questions about Irish life between 1912 and 1923.

Average: 6.1 (8 votes)
Oct 31st 2016

Este curso introduce a los estudiantes de grado de habla hispana en los aspectos más relevantes de la lengua, la historia y la cultura del Egipto de los faraones.

Average: 7.8 (4 votes)
Oct 17th 2016

The British Empire continues to cause enormous disagreement among historians. Find out why and join the debate.

Average: 6.5 (2 votes)
Oct 17th 2016

The French Revolution was one of the most important upheavals in world history. This course examines its origins, course and outcomes.

Average: 7.1 (10 votes)

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