Christine Alvarado

 

 


 

Christine Alvarado is an Associate Teaching Professor in the Computer Science and Engineering Department at the University of California, San Diego. Prior to coming to UCSD in 2012, she was an Associate Professor of Computer Science with tenure at Harvey Mudd College. Her current efforts are focused on designing curriculum and programs to make computing and computing education more accessible and appealing, with the specific goal of increasing the number of women and underrepresented minorities who study computing. Her work is funded by several grants from the National Science Foundation including a Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award and a CISE Pathways to Revitalized Undergraduate Computing Education (CPATH) award and a Computing Education for the 21st Century (CE21) award. In 2013 she received the A. Richard Newton Educator ABIE Award from the Anita Borg Institute for her contributions diversity in computer science education. Dr. Alvarado received her undergraduate degree in computer science from Dartmouth in 1998, and S.M. and Ph.D. in computer science from MIT in 2000 and 2004, respectively. She served on the College Board's commission to design the new Advanced Placement Computer Science Principles, and recently served as a co-chair of the NCWIT Academic Alliance. She is currently general co-chair for the 2015 Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing.




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Dec 5th 2016

You’ve hit a major milestone as a computer scientist and are becoming a capable programmer. You now know how to solve problems, write algorithms, and analyze solutions; and you have a wealth of tools (like data structures) at your disposal. You may now be ready for an internship or (possibly) an entry-level software engineering job. But can you land the internship/job? It depends in part on how well you can solve new technical problems and communicate during interviews. How can you get better at this? Practice!

Average: 7.2 (5 votes)
Dec 5th 2016

How does Google Maps plan the best route for getting around town given current traffic conditions? How does an internet router forward packets of network traffic to minimize delay? How does an aid group allocate resources to its affiliated local partners? To solve such problems, we first represent the key pieces of data in a complex data structure. In this course, you’ll learn about data structures, like graphs, that are fundamental for working with structured real world data.

Average: 6.3 (12 votes)
Dec 5th 2016

How do Java programs deal with vast quantities of data? Many of the data structures and algorithms that work with introductory toy examples break when applications process real, large data sets. Efficiency is critical, but how do we achieve it, and how do we even measure it? In this course, you will use and analyze data structures that are used in industry-level applications, such as linked lists, trees, and hashtables.

Average: 6.3 (4 votes)
Dec 5th 2016

Welcome to our course on Object Oriented Programming in Java using data visualization. People come to this course with many different goals -- and we are really excited to work with all of you! Some of you want to be professional software developers, others want to improve your programming skills to implement that cool personal project that you’ve been thinking about, while others of you might not yet know why you’re here and are trying to figure out what this course is all about.

Average: 5.5 (8 votes)