William Cope

 

 


 

Educational Background:

Ph.D., History, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, 1987

B.A., History, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, 1979

Key Professional Appointments:

Research Professor, Educational Policy Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, 2006-present

Adjunct Professor, Globalism Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia, 2006-present

Director, Common Ground Publishing, 2001-present

Research Associate, Globalism Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia, 2001-2005

First Assistant Secretary, Dept. of the Prime Minister & Cabinet, Government of Australia, 1995-1996

Director, Office of Multicultural Affairs, Government of Australia, 1995-1996

Director, Bureau of Immigration, Multiculral and Population Research, Dept of Immigration & Multicultural Affairs, Government of Australia, 1995-1996

Director, Centre for Workplace Communication and Culture, University of Technology Sydney & James Cook University of North Queensland, 1993-1995

More info: http://education.illinois.edu/people/C/billcope




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Dec 12th 2016

For three decades and longer we have heard educators and technologists making a case for the transformative power of technology in learning. However, despite the rhetoric, in many ways and at most institutional sites, education is still relatively untouched by technology. Even when technologies are introduced, the changes sometimes seem insignificant and the results seem disappointing. If the print textbook is replaced by an e-book, do the social relations of knowledge and learning necessarily change at all or for the better? If the pen-and-paper test is mechanized, does this change the nature of our assessment systems? Technology, in other words, need not necessarily bring significant change. Technology might not even represent a step forward in education.

Average: 4.2 (5 votes)
Dec 12th 2016

This course opens with an exploration of the social context and aims of literacy teaching and learning. It goes on to describe a range of historical and contemporary approaches to literacy pedagogy, including didactic, authentic, functional, and critical approaches.

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Nov 21st 2016

This course introduces innovative approaches to learning and teaching, with a focus on the use of e-learning and social web technologies.

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