Larissa Van den Herik

 

 


 

Larissa van den Herik is a Professor of Public International Law and Editor in Chief of the LeidenJournal of International Law. She has previously worked at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, where she defended her PhD thesis on The Contribution of the Rwanda Tribunal to the Development of International Law (Martinus Nijhoff) in 2005. She was awarded the Bulthuis Van Oosternieland Prize for this academic work. In 2007, Larissa received a three-year grant from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research to do research on illegal trade during times of armed conflict: the responsibility of corporations and individual businessmen Dr. Van den Herik is a member of the Editorial Board of De Internationale Spectator and a commentator of the Dutch International Crimes Act (Militair Straf- en Tuchtrecht, losbladige editie, Kluwer) and annotator for the International Law in Domestic Courts Project (OUP, University of Amsterdam). She is the author of several articles and annotations in the field of public international law, international criminal law and the law on peace and security, as well as co-editor of collections of essays in the field of international criminal law (Future Perspectives on International Criminal Justice, T.M.C. Asser Press – Cambridge University Press, 2009 and Fragmentation and Diversification of International Criminal Law, in preparation). She coordinates the Marie Curie Research Course and Top Summer School on International Criminal Law (together with Dr. Carsten Stahn).

More info: http://www.law.leiden.edu/organisation/publiclaw/publicinternationallaw/...




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Nov 21st 2016

International Law in Action explains the functions of each international court and tribunal present in The Hague, and it looks at how these institutions address contemporary problems. On the basis of selected cases, and through interviews with judges and lawyers, you will explore the role of these courts and tribunals and their potential to contribute to global justice.

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