Aug 22nd 2016

Improving the Health of Women, Children and Adolescents: from Evidence to Action (FutureLearn)

Consider the latest data, priorities and debates about the health of mothers, children and adolescents in this free online course.

At a time of global concern over emerging infectious and chronic diseases, it is important to remember that millions of women and children continue to die every year from conditions that are easily preventable and treatable.

This free online course presents the latest data, priorities and debates about the health of adolescents, mothers, newborns and children in an accessible way, so that everyone has the opportunity to engage with the issues.

Explore the lifecycle from birth to adulthood

The course will run over six weeks, exploring the lifecycle from birth to adulthood, to look at adolescent, reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health.

Each week will focus on a different area, inviting you to discuss the most recent data, and the current policy, programme and research debates that inform action to improve health outcomes.

At the end of the course we will reflect on the importance of lifecycle thinking for women, children and adolescents in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals for 2030.

Get multiple perspectives on maternal and child health

The Centre for Maternal, Adolescent, Reproductive, and Child Health (MARCH) is the central hub for women’s and children’s health at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and comprises more than 150 academics working around the world in 100 countries, from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe. In this course, you will hear from MARCH Centre experts in a range of disciplines, including epidemiology, demography, anthropology, medicine and public health.

Contributors include:

Professor Joy Lawn, Director of the MARCH Centre

Professor David Ross from the World Health Organisation Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health.

Understand case studies from around the globe

Through the use of case studies, multimedia content and discussions with other learners from around the globe, we will consider the latest evidence about how to improve the health of women, children and adolescents in the context of different country settings.