London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

 

 


 

The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine is a world leader in research and postgraduate education in public and global health.

The School’s mission is to improve health and health equity in the UK and worldwide; working in partnership to achieve excellence in public and global health research, education and translation of knowledge into policy and practice.

The School was named the world’s leading research-focused graduate school (Times Higher Education 2013), and is now among the world’s top 100 universities by reputation (March 2014). In May 2014, it was ranked in the top 10 of all universities in the world for citation rate by the new EU-supported U-Multirank database, and fourth in the world for impact in medical sciences by the Leiden Ranking.

The School’s research income has grown to over £79 million per year from national and international funding sources including the UK government, the European Commission, the Wellcome Trust and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The School’s multidisciplinary expertise includes clinicians, epidemiologists, statisticians, social scientists, molecular biologists and immunologists.

The School’s staff, students and alumni work in more than 180 countries in government, academia, international agencies and health services.

More info here.




Customize your search:

E.g., 2017-07-08
E.g., 2017-07-08
E.g., 2017-07-08
Jul 17th 2017

Discover the science behind the Zika outbreak to understand how it is spread and can be controlled. The Zika virus is suspected to be the cause of cases of microcephaly in newborns in South America, and this outbreak has now been declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern by the World Health Organization. With global attention towards this disease increasing rapidly, it is becoming clear that there is limited knowledge around how the carriers, or vectors, of Zika, are best avoided and controlled.

No votes yet
Jun 26th 2017

Discover the health needs of those affected by humanitarian crises, challenges of delivering healthcare, and what we must do next. Humanitarian crises due to armed conflict, natural disasters, disease outbreaks and other hazards are a major and growing contributor to ill-health and vulnerability worldwide, and their continuing effects on health and health systems can undermine decades of social development.

No votes yet
Jun 26th 2017

Understand where public health has come from, why it looks the way it does today and where it might go next. History can offer us a unique insight into the public health problems, policies, and practices of the past, and is of critical importance to our understanding of healthcare in the contemporary world. This online course will offer you an opportunity to bring the past into conversation with the present, enabling you to set the changing nature of public health in post-war Britain in context with changes seen today.

Average: 5 (1 vote)
Jun 19th 2017

Consider the latest data, priorities and debates about the health of mothers, children and adolescents in this free online course.

Average: 5.2 (5 votes)
Apr 17th 2017

Discover how communities and experts are joining together to end trachoma disease across 42 endemic countries by the year 2020. An estimated 200 million people are at risk of trachoma in 42 countries. Trachoma is a neglected tropical disease. It occurs in some of the poorest populations with limited access to clean water, sanitation, and healthcare, and is the world’s leading infectious cause of blindness. At present, we have a unique opportunity to eliminate this disease.

No votes yet
Feb 20th 2017

Understand global blindness and how to plan effective eye care with this free online course for health professionals. Around the world, 285 million people are blind or visually impaired. 75% of this is avoidable and 90% is in low- and middle-income countries. In this free online course, we highlight the key facts about avoidable blindness and global initiatives to address it.

No votes yet
Aug 31st 2015

How has the Ebola outbreak become a humanitarian emergency? Learn about the science behind the crisis.

No votes yet