Mark Zupan

 

 


 

Dean Zupan assumed his duties at the Simon School on a full-time basis on January 1, 2004. He is responsible for the administrative and academic functions of the Simon School, and serves as the leading advocate of the School’s faculty, programs and students to the business community and other external constituencies.

Zupan served as dean and pro­fessor of economics at the University of Ari­zona’s Eller College of Management from 1997 to 2003. Among his accomplishments at Eller were highly successful fundraising efforts, a record of promoting scholarship, fostering innovation in academic programs and enhanced community outreach.

Before his appointment at Arizona, Zupan taught at the University of South­ern California’s Marshall School of Busi­ness, where he also served as associate dean of master’s programs. He was a teaching fellow in Harvard’s Department of Economics while pursuing his doctoral studies at M.I.T., and he has been a visiting faculty member at the Amos Tuck School of Business Ad­min­istration at Dartmouth College.

Zupan’s research interests include water policy, the influence of economics and ideological preferences on the political behavior of voters and elected officials, industrial organization, regulation and political economy. He has re­ceived research grants from the National Sci­ence Foundation and the Center for Inter­na­tional Business Education and Research at the University of Southern California. He is the co-author of two books: Micro­economic Theory and Ap­plications (with E. K. Browning), published by John Wiley and Sons, and Micro­economic Cases and Applications (with T. W. Gilligan and A. M. Marino), published by HarperCollins.

Zupan is also the author of numerous scholarly articles which have appeared in leading publications including the American Economic Review, Journal of Law and Economics, Rand Journal of Economics, Public Choice, and Journal of Regulatory Economics. His opinion pieces have appeared in such outlets as The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, the Financial Times of London, Los Angeles Times, Arizona Republic, BusinessWeek.com, Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, NY) and San Francisco Chronicle. He has served as co-editor of the journal Economic Inquiry, and is on the editorial boards of Public Choice, Journal of Business Economics and Research in Law and Economics.

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Dec 5th 2016

This opening module of the Power of Markets course covers the basic assumptions about market participants made by economists, the concept of opportunity cost, and the key determinants of supply and demand. We will then learn how to use the supply-demand framework to explain and predict market outcomes and to show how government policies affect those market outcomes. We will look at how quantity demanded and supplied respond to their key determinants in quantitative (elasticity) as well as qualitative terms. The last two weeks of the first module will investigate consumer behavior more closely and show how consumer choices are driven by the interplay of preferences and budget constraints.

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Dec 5th 2016

In order to maximize profits, firms must ensure that any given output level is produced at least cost and then select the price-output combination that results in total revenue exceeding total cost by the greatest amount possible. With this in mind, this second module of the Power of Markets course addresses how firms can most effectively convert inputs into final output and then covers determining the best price-output combination for a firm and how this varies depending on whether the firm is operating in a perfectly competitive or imperfectly competitive market setting.

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Dec 5th 2016

The final module of the Power of Markets course begins by further exploring firm behavior in imperfectly competitive market settings: how firms with monopoly power can increase profits through price discrimination; and the price-output combinations we can expect firms to select in cases of monopolistic competition and oligopoly. We will also analyze monopolies from an efficiency perspective and look at the effects of imperfect information on firm and consumer behavior. We will next turn to exploring input markets and what determines the demand for an input by a firm, an industry, and the overall market.

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Nov 4th 2013

The course will give you the tools with which to understand and predict market phenomena. A large dose of real-world applications will be provided along the way. These applications illustrate the power and relevance of underlying microeconomic theory while providing you a valuable opportunity to put the theory into practice.

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