Jennifer Widner

 

 


 

Jennifer Widner is Professor of Politics and International Affairs and Director of the Mamdouha S. Bobst Center for Peace & Justice. She runs a research program on institution building and institutional reform called Innovations for Successful Societies, a joint initiative of the Bobst Center and the Woodrow Wilson School. Before joining the Princeton faculty in 2004-5, she taught at Harvard and the University of Michigan. Her current research focuses on the political economy of institutional reform, government accountability, and service delivery. She also remains interested in constitution writing, constitutional design, and fair dealing—topics of earlier research. She is author of Building the Rule of Law (W. W. Norton), a study of courts and law in Africa, and she has published articles on a variety of topics in Democratization, Comparative Politics, Comparative Political Studies, Journal of Development Studies, The William & Mary Law Review, Daedalus, the American Journal of International Law, and other publications. She is completing work on a book about making government work in challenging settings, drawing on experiences in Africa, Asia, and parts of Latin America.

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Oct 21st 2015

Learn from people who have helped build better government in challenging settings around the globe, and develop your own ability to analyze and solve similar problems.

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May 15th 2015

This course is about writing “science of delivery" case studies that help us understand how practitioners have addressed complex policy or program implementation challenges. It offers an orientation to the research, writing, and ethics of interview-based case study research.

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Jan 25th 2015

Across the globe many political leaders and civic groups seek to help their governments work better. They have the will to build change and a vision of a better future for citizens. The challenge is how to deliver on the promises made—how to create new practices, build new institutions, implement new policies, and transform incentives to sustain improvement. This course introduces a way to think about solutions to common, yet difficult delivery challenges.

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