Martine Haas

 

 


 

Professor Martine Haas is an Associate Professor of Management at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. Previously, she served as an assistant professor at Cornell University’s School of Industrial & Labor Relations, and as a visiting professor at London Business School. Professor Haas’s work focuses on collaboration in global, knowledge-intensive organizations. Her research and teaching interests include global teams, knowledge sharing information technology use, managing human capital, implementing strategic capabilities, field research methods, and the sociology & social psychology of organizations. She currently serves as an Associate Editor for the Academy of Management Journal and on the Executive Committee of the Organization & Management Theory Division of the Academy of Management. Professor Haas is an award-winning teacher who has taught courses in global strategy, general management, and organizational behavior to executives, PhD students, MBA students, and undergraduates. She has worked for McKinsey & Company in London and for the international aid agency Oxfam, and as a consultant to a range of organizations including the World Bank, the BBC, and the Tate Gallery of Modern Art.




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Dec 5th 2016

People analytics is a data-driven approach to managing people at work. For the first time in history, business leaders can make decisions about their people based on deep analysis of data rather than the traditional methods of personal relationships, decision making based on experience, and risk avoidance. In this brand new course, three of Wharton’s top professors, all pioneers in the field of people analytics, will explore the state-of-the-art techniques used to recruit and retain great people, and demonstrate how these techniques are used at cutting-edge companies. They’ll explain how data and sophisticated analysis is brought to bear on people-related issues, such as recruiting, performance evaluation, leadership, hiring and promotion, job design, compensation, and collaboration.

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