John Weinman

 

 


 

Professor John Weinman is Professor of Psychology as applied to Medicine at the Institute of Psychiatry in the Kings College London. He is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society, the European Health Psychology Society and of the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research. He has played a major role in the development of academic and professional health psychology in the UK. His main research areas are cognition and health, communication and decision-making in health care, stress, wound healing and recovery from surgery, and self-regulation and self-management in chronic illness. He was the founding editor of Psychology and Health : an International Journal and has edited and written a large number of books, chapters and research papers in the field of health psychology.He was previously Chair of the Population & Behavioural Sciences Committee of Cancer Research UK.

More info: http://www.iop.kcl.ac.uk/staff/profile/default.aspx?go=11721




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Oct 2nd 2017

Initiate and support behaviour change in patients with medicines adherence problems – not taking their medicines as prescribed. This course has been designed by psychologists and clinicians at King’s College London for people interested in medicines adherence. Using evidenced-and theory-based techniques, you will deepen your awareness and understanding of current practical and theoretical issues around medicines adherence.

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Jun 12th 2017

How can healthcare professionals help patients to improve their health through medicines adherence? It is estimated that 30-50% of patients do not take their medicines as prescribed. So how should we, as healthcare professionals, respond? As medicines are key to the successful management of chronic conditions, underuse or non-adherence represents a lost opportunity for the health improvement for the patient as well as being a waste of valuable resources for healthcare systems. In Europe alone, the cost of poor adherence to treatment is estimated at 195,000 lives and €20 billion annually.

Average: 6.3 (4 votes)