Kotlin For Beginners: References, Immutability (Const and Val), Properties, Variables, Data Classes (Skillshare)

Kotlin For Beginners: References, Immutability (Const and Val), Properties, Variables, Data Classes (Skillshare)
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Kotlin For Beginners: References, Immutability (Const and Val), Properties, Variables, Data Classes (Skillshare)
In this short class, you will learn the fundamentals of how to represent information virtually in a Kotlin program. About half of what we do as programmers is design data structures to represent real world information virtually, and it turns out that there are good and bad ways to do this! One of the most important takeaways of this class, is that it is critically important to separate things which change (mutable) from things which don't change (immutable).

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Topics include:

- How references work with the JVM (simplified for beginners)

- The problem of Shared Mutable State (this is bad)

- How to avoid Shared Mutable State by introducing Immutability (const val and val properties) to your code

- How and when it makes sense to use var references

- How to make classes, and the data class construct


As discussed in this class, one of the most difficult technical challenges which programmers face, is dealing with Shared Mutable State (Shared change-able data). Our first defense against such problems, is to work with Immutable Data as often as possible.

Using either the try.kotlinlang.org online IDE, or your own preferred IDE, write a simple program which has:

- A data class of some kind with at least two val properties, such as a "User" data class

- A main function which serves as the entry point of the program's execution

Instructions:

1. Create a val reference of the same type as your data class (i.e. instantiate your data class)

2. Create a second val reference from the first val reference, using the copy() function (this function comes from the data class keyword).

3. Change at least one of the properties in this new val reference, by using default arguments within the copy() function.

The purpose of this small project is to get you used to working with immutable data and vals. At first it can appear impossible to make a working program using data classes with only val references, but by using the copy function, we can create new immutable copies based on old data, mutating only the properties we wish to!



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