Kenji Hakuta

 

 


 

Kenji Hakuta is the Lee L. Jacks Professor of Education at Stanford University. He has been at Stanford since 1989, except for three years when he left to serve the new University of California at Merced as its Founding Dean of the School of Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts. He received his Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology from Harvard University, and began his career as a developmental psycholinguist at Yale University. He is the author of many research papers and books on language, bilingualism and education, including Mirror of Language: The Debate on Bilingualism. Hakuta is active in education policy. He has testified to Congress and courts on language policy, the education of language minority students, affirmative action in higher education, and improvement of quality in educational research. Hakuta is an elected Member of the National Academy of Education, a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association, and Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, recognized for his accomplishments in Linguistics and Language Sciences. He has served on the board of various organizations, including the Educational Testing Service, the Spencer Foundation, and the New Teacher Center.

More info: http://www.stanford.edu/~hakuta/




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Feb 18th 2016

This course looks closely at student-to-student conversations and addresses ways to improve students' abilities to engage in the types of interactions described in the new standards.

Average: 7.2 (6 votes)
Oct 2nd 2015

In this course teachers will use a range of practical tools for gathering and analyzing language samples that show how students currently construct claims supported by evidence and/or reasoning, as well as identifying next steps in students’ development.

Average: 10 (2 votes)
Oct 1st 2014

The Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards emphasize improving the quality of student-to-student discourse as a major feature of instruction. The new standards specifically describe the importance of students understanding the reasoning of others and engaging in meaningful conversations using evidence for claims. This short course looks closely at student-to-student conversations and addresses ways to improve students' abilities to engage in the types of interactions described in the new standards.

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May 6th 2014

Formative assessment is an instructional practice to gauge where your students are in their learning by gathering evidence of their learning, assessing the evidence, and planning the next steps in instruction. The language produced by your students, whether that language is in oral or written form, constitutes a key piece of evidence.

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Mar 26th 2014

The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics are notable for raising the rigor of student language demands during math instruction. Students are expected to understand complex problems, engage in constructive classroom conversations about math, and clearly support their reasoning with evidence. In this course teachers will be provided with a range of practical tools for gathering and analyzing language samples that show how students learn and what supports they need in elementary math classrooms.

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