Colleen van Lent

 

 


 

I am a Lecturer III in the School of Information at the University of Michigan. I focus on the introductory programming courses such as Programming I (SI 543) and Web Design (SI 206 and SI 539).

I came to UMSI from Cal State University Long Beach where I was an associate professor in the Computer Engineering and Computer Science Department. I was at U of M previously as a visiting scholar. My PhD is in Computer Science from the University of Pittsburgh.

More info here.




Customize your search:

E.g., 2016-12-10
E.g., 2016-12-10
E.g., 2016-12-10
Dec 12th 2016

Thanks to a growing number of software programs, it seems as if anyone can make a webpage. But what if you actually want to understand how the page was created? There are great textbooks and online resources for learning web design, but most of those resources require some background knowledge. This course is designed to help the novice who wants to gain confidence and knowledge. We will explore the theory (what actually happens when you click on a link on a webpage?), the practical (what do I need to know to make my own page?), and the overlooked (I have a page, what do I do now?).

Average: 7 (3 votes)
Dec 12th 2016

If you want to take your website to the next level, the ability to incorporate interactivity is a must. But adding some of these types of capabilities requires a stronger programming language than HTML5 or CSS3, and JavaScript can provide just what you need. With just a basic understanding of the language, you can create a page that will react to common events such as page loads, mouse clicks & movements, and even keyboard input.

Average: 8.5 (2 votes)
Dec 12th 2016

It used to be the case that everyone viewed webpages on about the same size screen. But with the explosion of the use of smartphones to access the Internet, the landscape of design has completely changed. People viewing your site will now expect that it will perform regardless of the platform (smartphone, tablet, laptop, or desktop computer). This ability to respond to any platform is called responsive design.

Average: 8 (3 votes)
Dec 12th 2016

The web today is almost unrecognizable from the early days of white pages with lists of blue links. Now, sites are designed with complex layouts, unique fonts, and customized color schemes. This course will show you the basics of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS3). The emphasis will be on learning how to write CSS rules, how to test code, and how to establish good programming habits.

Average: 4 (2 votes)