Anthony DelDonna

 

 


 

Anthony R. DelDonna is a specialist in eighteenth-century topics and in particular Neapolitan music, musicians and culture. He earned the Ph.D. in Historical Musicology “with distinction” from The Catholic University of America (1998). His research has focused primarily on opera, archival studies, performance practice and ballet. Prof. DelDonna’s research has been published in peer-reviewed journals such as Eighteenth-Century Studies, Early Music, Eighteenth-Century Music, Recercare, Studi musicali and Civiltà musicale as well as essays in scholarly volumes dedicated to the eighteenth century. He is the co-editor of The Cambridge Companion to 18th century Opera (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009) and editor for Genre and Music in the 18th century (Ann Arbor: Steglein Press, 2008). Together with Antonio Caroccia, DelDonna has published a series of performance editions for clarinet and piano by Ferdinando Sebastiani (1803-1860) with Castejon Music Editions. DelDonna's monograph Opera, Theatrical Culture and Society in Late Eighteenth-Century Naples is published by Ashgate Press (2012). His transcription of the oratorio Trionfo per l’Assunzione della Santissima Vergine (Nicola Ceva, 1705) will be published by Fondazione Arcadia.

More info: http://explore.georgetown.edu/people/DelDonna/




Customize your search:

E.g., 2016-12-06
E.g., 2016-12-06
E.g., 2016-12-06
Sep 28th 2016

After his harrowing descent into the depths of despair, the Pilgrim Dante emerges with Virgil onto the Isle of Mount Purgatorio in the southern hemisphere. There he will be healed of sin and prepared for his climactic reunion with Beatrice.

Average: 3.7 (3 votes)
Mar 15th 2016

Jorge Luis Borges, the great Argentine writer, said that no one should deny themselves the pleasure of reading Dante's Divine Comedy. In this course, you will discover precisely what Borges meant.

No votes yet
Jun 10th 2015

Leaving Earth behind and beneath, the Pilgrim Dante is transformed into the disciple of Beatrice. She now becomes his true path, la diritta via, along which he gradually discovers the Joy that Christianity identifies as the hope of Resurrection.

No votes yet