Mung Chiang

Mung Chiang is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Princeton University, and served as the Director of Graduate Studies in Electrical Engineering since 2009. He is also an affiliated faculty in Applied and Computational Mathematics, and in Computer Science. He received his B.S. (Hons.), M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University in 1999, 2000, and 2003, respectively, and was an Assistant Professor 2003-2008 and a tenured Associate Professor 2008-2011 at Princeton University. He was a Hertz Fellow in 1999-2003, a H. B. Wentz Junior Faculty at Princeton in 2005, and was elected an IEEE Fellow in 2012.
More info here.

Sort options

Networks Illustrated: Principles without Calculus (Coursera)

What makes WiFi faster at home than at a coffee shop? How does Google order its search results from the trillions of webpages on the Internet? Why does Verizon charge $15 for every GB of data we use? Is it really true that we are connected in six social [...]
1
Average: 1 ( 4 votes )

Networks: Friends, Money, and Bytes (Coursera)

You pick up your iPhone while waiting in line at a coffee shop. You google a not-so-famous actor, get linked to a Wikipedia entry listing his recent movies and popular YouTube clips of several of them. You check out user reviews on Amazon and pick one, download that movie [...]
10
Average: 10 ( 3 votes )