John McGready

Since joining the faculty at Hopkins, Dr. McGready has split his time between research collaborations and statistical education. He is the primary instructor for “Statistical Reasoning in Public Health I and II" taught both on campus, and on line, and an instructor for “Statistical Methods in Public Health III " . He is the co-creator and instructor of intensive data analysis workshops offered in the School's Summer Institute of Epidemiology and Biostatistics.
Dr. McGready is also actively involved collaborative research. His efforts include/have included collaborations with Department of Health Policy and Management at Johns Hopkins, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Anne Arundel County Medical Center, Greater Baltimore Medical Center, and Johns Hopkins Healthcare.
Dr. McGready's research interests include:
- statistical education
- small sample properties of both classical and computer driven methods of estimation and inference
- applications of advanced semi-parametric smoothing techniques to anthropomorphic data
- exploring unanswered questions from first principles of statistics
- rectifying differences in interpretation and estimates between mixed effects and GEE approaches to analyzing longitudinal data
In 2001, 2004, 2008 and 2012, Dr. McGready was awarded a Golden Apple Award for excellence in teaching by the on-site student body. In 2001 and 2005 he received the Teaching Award for Excellence in Distance Education, as voted upon by distance education students. In 2010 he received the ASPH/Pfizer Early Career Award for Teaching Excellence, and the Outstanding Teacher Award given by the Teaching Statistics in Health Sciences section of the American Statistical Association.
Prior to coming to Hopkins, Dr. McGready served as a quantitative policy analyst, focusing on criminal justice policy in the United States (federal and state levels). Previously, Dr. McGready also taught high-school-level math in Washington, D.C., and worked as a health care data analyst for Healthcare Investment Analysts (now HCIA/Sachs).
More info: http://www.biostat.jhsph.edu/~jmcgread/

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Simple Regression Analysis in Public Health (Coursera)

Biostatistics is the application of statistical reasoning to the life sciences, and it's the key to unlocking the data gathered by researchers and the evidence presented in the scientific public health literature. In this course, we'll focus on the use of simple regression methods to determine the relationship between [...]
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Hypothesis Testing in Public Health (Coursera)

Biostatistics is an essential skill for every public health researcher because it provides a set of precise methods for extracting meaningful conclusions from data. In this second course of the Biostatistics in Public Health Specialization, you'll learn to evaluate sample variability and apply statistical hypothesis testing [...]
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Summary Statistics in Public Health (Coursera)

Biostatistics is the application of statistical reasoning to the life sciences, and it is the key to unlocking the data gathered by researchers and the evidence presented in the scientific literature. In this course, we'll focus on the use of statistical measurement methods within the world of public health [...]
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Multiple Regression Analysis in Public Health (Coursera)

Biostatistics is the application of statistical reasoning to the life sciences, and it's the key to unlocking the data gathered by researchers and the evidence presented in the scientific public health literature. In this course, you'll extend simple regression to the prediction of a single outcome of interest on [...]
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Statistical Reasoning for Public Health 2: Regression Methods (Coursera)

A practical and example filled tour of simple and multiple regression techniques (linear, logistic, and Cox PH) for estimation, adjustment and prediction.
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Statistical Reasoning for Public Health 1: Estimation, Inference, & Interpretation (Coursera)

A conceptual and interpretive public health approach to some of the most commonly used methods from basic statistics.
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