David Schanzer

 

 


 

David Schanzer is an associate professor of the practice at Duke University and director of the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security, a research consortium between Duke, UNC-Chapel Hill and RTI International. In these capacities, he teaches courses on counterterrorism strategy, counterterrorism law and homeland security.


He also serves as the director for strategy and outreach for the Institute of Homeland Security Solutions, a North Carolina-based research consortium focused on applied social science research for homeland security.


Schanzer is the lead author of a widely cited National Institute of Justice study on domestic radicalization – “Anti-Terror Lessons of Muslim Americans” (2010) – and a report on “Improving Strategic Risk Management at the Department of Homeland Security,” published by the IBM Center for the Business of Government.


Prior to his academic appointments, Schanzer was the Democratic staff director for the House of Representatives Committee on Homeland Security from 2003 to 2005. He previously served as the legislative director for Sen. Jean Carnahan (2001-2002), counsel to Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. (1996-1998), and counsel to Sen. William S. Cohen (1994-1996).


His positions in the executive branch include special counsel, Office of General Counsel, Department of Defense (1998-2001) and trial attorney, United States Department of Justice (1992-94). Schanzer was a clerk for U.S. District Judge Norma L. Shapiro and in the Office of the Solicitor General of the United States.


Schanzer is a graduate of Harvard College where he received an A.B. cum laude in government in 1985 and of Harvard Law School, where he served as an editor of the Harvard Law Review from 1987-1989. Schanzer has appeared on international, national and local radio and television discussing terrorism and homeland security and is the author of more than 20 op-ed articles on these subjects that have appeared in newspapers around the country.


More info: http://fds.duke.edu/db/Sanford/faculty/schanzer/




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Oct 20th 2014

9/11 was a devastating attack that required a comprehensive response from the United States. This course will examine post-9/11 U.S. counterterrorism policies regarding the use of military force, law enforcement and intelligence collection, and domestic security. We will trace these policies to the current day and assess their legality, ethics, and efficacy.

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Sep 9th 2013

This course will explore the forces that led to the 9/11 attacks and the policies the United States adopted in response. We will examine the phenomenon of modern terrorism, the development of the al Qai'da ideology, and the process by which individuals radicalize towards violence.

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