Alexander Guerrero

 

 


 

Alexander is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy and an Assistant Professor of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the University of Pennsylvania. He has a joint appointment in the School of Arts and Sciences and the Perelman School of Medicine. He received his PhD from the NYU Philosophy Department in 2012, and he has a JD from NYU School of Law.

More info: http://www.alexguerrero.org/




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Dec 5th 2016

What is the purpose of government? Why should we have a State? What kind of State should we have? Even within a political community, there may be sharp disagreements about the role and purpose of government. Some want an active, involved government, seeing legal and political institutions as the means to solve our most pressing problems, and to help bring about peace, equality, justice, happiness, and to protect individual liberty. Others want a more minimal government, motivated, perhaps, by some of the disastrous political experiments of the 20th Century, and the thought that political power is often just a step away from tyranny. In many cases, these disagreements arise out of deep philosophical disagreements.

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Dec 5th 2016

What is the purpose of government? Why should we have a State? What kind of State should we have? Even within a political community, there may be sharp disagreements about the role and purpose of government. Some want an active, involved government, seeing legal and political institutions as the means to solve our most pressing problems, and to help bring about peace, equality, justice, happiness, and to protect individual liberty. Others want a more minimal government, motivated, perhaps, by some of the disastrous political experiments of the 20th Century, and the thought that political power is often just a step away from tyranny. In many cases, these disagreements arise out of deep philosophical disagreements.

Average: 10 (1 vote)
Sep 21st 2014

Political and legal institutions are built on foundational, philosophical ideas--ideas about freedom, equality, justice, and happiness. In this course, we will explore those ideas, taking the institutions around us not as fixed and unquestionable, but as things to evaluate and, if necessary, to change.

Average: 6 (2 votes)