Tricia Woodhead




Tricia has spent 24 years as a consultant radiologist in the NHS. During 12 of these years she was Medical Director and Director/ Quality and Patient Safety. She is a Health Foundation and IHI Quality Improvement Fellow and Improvement Advisor, having been awarded the Fellowship in 2010

Tricia is Associate Clinical Director for the West of England AHSN with a major responsibility for continuing the five-year South West Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Programme. She works across the South West, South of England and London on collaborative projects to improve reliability and patient safety in acute, community and mental health services. This includes Improvement Advisor to Zero Suicide, a recently launched four-year collaborative across the whole community in the South West and is leadership coach to the Wessex AHSN. She also supports Wessex AHSN in their Patient Safety Collaboration Programme.

Until January 2016, Tricia was tPatient Safety Advisor to the Royal College of Radiologists. She is currently supporting the Royal College of Physicians as they develop their Quality Improvement Hub.

She teaches Leadership for Patient Safety as Associate Clinical Lecturer at Keele University Medical School. She is Visiting Senior Research Fellow at the University of Bath, working with The School of Management on systems and networks in Healthcare.

During 2015 Tricia co-authored the Health Foundation Report ‘Building the Foundations for Improvement’, and presented at the International Forum for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety in London on how to build systems to secure sustainable improvement in clinical care.

She is one of the programme visit leads for the IHI/ Commonwealth Fund Innovation Sharing Network with particular focus on frail care and the safer management elderly patient. She teaches the Patient Safety Officer Course in the UK with IHI.

More info here.

E.g., 2016-10-24
E.g., 2016-10-24
E.g., 2016-10-24
Sep 5th 2016

Explore new and better ways of organising health and social care services, to improve quality, with this free online course. Why is quality improvement in health and social care systems so difficult? Why is it so challenging to bring in new and better ways of organising health and social care services?

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