Mark W. Newman

 

 


 

Mark W. Newman is an Associate Professor in the School of Information and the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan. He is the Human Computer Interaction specialization coordinator for the Masters of Science in Information at the University of Michigan, and he is a founder of the campus-wide Michigan Interactive and Social Computing (MISC) group. He received an Outstanding Teaching Award in 2012 and an NSF CAREER Award in 2009. His research interests are in the areas of Human-Computer Interaction and Ubiquitous Computing, with a focus on support for design, prototyping, and evaluation of novel applications and technologies.

Before joining the University of Michigan, Mark was a research scientist in the Computer Science Laboratory at the Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) from 2000-2007. He earned his Ph.D. and M.S. in Computer Science from UC Berkeley and his B.A. in Philosophy from Macalester College.




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Nov 15th 2016

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