Gregory Nagy

 

 


 

Born in Budapest, Hungary, Professor Nagy was educated at Indiana University and Harvard University, where he studied Classical Philology and Linguistics, receiving his Ph.D. in 1966. He has held positions at Johns Hopkins University and since 1975 in Harvard University, where he was named in 1984 the Francis Jones Professor of Classical Greek Literature and Professor of Comparative Literature. He is also currently the Curator of the Milman Parry Collection of Oral Literature and, since August of 2000, the Director of Harvard University's Center for Hellenic Studies. Professor Nagy has served as Chair of the Harvard University Classics Department and as President of the American Philological Association.

Professor Nagy is a renowned authority in the field of Homeric and related Greek studies. His numerous honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship and the Goodwin Award of Merit of the American Philological Association for his book, The Best of the Achaeans (1979). In addition to this path-breaking work, he has published Greek Dialects and the Transformation of an Indo-European Process (1970), Comparative Studies in Greek and Indic Meter (1974), Pindar’s Homer: The Lyric Possession of an Epic Past (1990), Greek Mythology and Poetics (1990), Poetry as Performance: Homer and Beyond (1996), Homeric Questions (1996) Plato's Rhapsody and Homer's Music (2002), Homeric Responses (2004), and Homer's Text and Language (2004); he has as well edited or co-edited various volumes and written almost a hundred articles and reviews. Professor Nagy has lectured widely in North America and Europe on a great range of topics, especially concentrated in Homeric and Archaic Greek questions. He is a strong proponent of the use of technology in teaching, and in the teaching and use of student writing in the core curriculum.

More info: http://chs.harvard.edu/wa/pageR?tn=ArticleWrapper&bdc=12&mn=1234




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Aug 15th 2016

Discover the literature and heroes of ancient Greece through the Homeric Iliad and Odyssey, the tragedies of Sophocles, the dialogues of Plato, and more.

Average: 6.6 (5 votes)
Nov 12th 2014

Focusing on transformation of the hero into the logos, or word of philosophical dialogue, this is the fifth of five modules on the Ancient Greek Hero as portrayed in classical literature, song, performance, art, and cult.

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Oct 22nd 2014

Focusing on the Greek hero best known to us from the perspective of world literature – as viewed through the lens of Tragedy – this is the fourth of five modules on the Ancient Greek Hero as portrayed in classical literature, song, performance, art, and cult.

Average: 7.5 (2 votes)
Oct 8th 2014

Focusing on poetry and prose accounts of mystique of male and female cult heroes, which enthralled their ancient worshippers, this is the third of five modules on the Ancient Greek Hero as portrayed in classical literature, song, performance, art, and cult.

Average: 10 (3 votes)
Sep 14th 2014

Focusing on the interaction of Homeric epic and the visual arts, this is the second of five modules on the Ancient Greek Hero as portrayed in classical literature, song, performance, art, and cult.

Average: 10 (2 votes)
Sep 2nd 2014

Focusing on Epic (Homer’s Iliad) and Lyric (Sappho’s poems), this is the first of five modules on the Ancient Greek Hero as portrayed in classical literature, song, performance, and cult.

Average: 10 (1 vote)