Stuart Kaye

 

 


 

Stuart Kaye is Professor of Law at the Australian National Centre for Ocean Resources and Security at the University of Wollongong. He is also the Academic Leader of the University’s research theme of Sustaining Oceans and Coastal Communities within the University’s Global Challenges Program. Prior to this appointment he was Dean and Winthrop Professor of Law at the University of Western Australia between 2010 and 2013.

He also previously held a Chair in Law at the University of Melbourne and was Dean of Law at the University of Wollongong between 2002 and 2006. He holds degrees in arts and law from the University of Sydney, winning the Law Graduates’ Association Medal, and a doctorate in law from Dalhousie University. He is admitted as a barrister of the Supreme Courts of New South Wales, Tasmania and Queensland. He has written a number of books, including Australia's Maritime Boundaries (2001), The Torres Strait (1998), and International Fisheries Management (2001) as well as co-authoring International Law – Cases and Material with Australian Perspectives (2nd Edn, 2014) for Cambridge University Press.

He was appointed to the International Hydrographic Organization's Panel of Experts on Maritime Boundary Delimitation in 1995 and in 2000 was appointed to the List of Arbitrators under the Environmental Protocol to the Antarctic Treaty. He was chair of the Australian International Humanitarian Law Committee from 2003 to 2009, for which he was awarded the Australian Red Cross Society Distinguished Service Medal. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society in 2007 and the Australian Academy of Law in 2011, and has been successful, individually or as a team member, in ten Australian Research Council grant applications. He holds the rank of Commander in the Royal Australian Navy Reserve, principally providing advice in respect of operations and international law. In 2005 he chaired a review commissioned by the Department of Defence and the Australian Customs Service into offshore maritime powers which recommended changes to the law which resulted in the Maritime Powers Act 2013 (Cth).

More info: http://lha.uow.edu.au/law/acastaff/UOW158864.html




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Nov 21st 2016

Learn about how the world’s oceans are regulated, protected and preserved. This course considers the nature of how the world’s oceans are regulated. It will go through how ocean governance has evolved through time and how it actually works. In addition, there will be a focus on particular issues such as piracy, maritime security and environmental protection for the oceans.

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