Paul Blanchard

 

 


 

Paul Blanchard is professor of mathematics at Boston University. He grew up in Sutton, Massachusetts, USA, spent his undergraduate years at Brown University, and received his Ph.D. from Yale University. He has taught mathematics for more than thirty years, mostly at Boston University. His main area of mathematical research is complex analytic dynamical systems and the related point sets---Julia sets and the Mandelbrot set. He is a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society.

He is the author of Calculus, 3e with Dennis Berkey. For many of the last twenty years, his efforts have focused on modernizing the traditional sophomore-level differential equations course. That effort has resulted in numerous workshops and minicourses. He has also authored five editions of Differential Equations with Robert L. Devaney and Glen R. Hall. When he becomes exhausted fixing the errors made by his two current coauthors, he heads for the golf course to enjoy a different type of frustration.

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Jun 23rd 2016

Learn the mathematical theory of nonlinear differential equations and their application to systems such as the pendulum, the glider, and the weather. Phenomena as diverse as the motion of the planets, the spread of a disease, and the oscillations of a suspension bridge are governed by differential equations.

Average: 8 (2 votes)
Apr 21st 2016

Learn the mathematical theory of linear differential equations and their application to systems such as the mass-spring system and other linear oscillations. Phenomena as diverse as the motion of the planets, the spread of a disease, and the oscillations of a suspension bridge are governed by differential equations. This course is an introduction to the mathematical theory of ordinary differential equations and follows a modern dynamical systems approach.

Average: 7.3 (3 votes)
Feb 4th 2016

Learn the mathematical theory of ordinary differential equations and its application to biological and physical systems.

Average: 5.4 (5 votes)