Jeremy Neely

 

 


 

Jeremy Neely is an Instructor of History at Missouri State University in Springfield. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Missouri-Columbia, where also he received that institution’s 2005 Distinguished Dissertation Award for his study, “Divided in the Middle: A History of the Kansas-Missouri Border, 1854-1896.” He later expanded that work into “The Border between Them: Violence and Reconciliation on the Kansas-Missouri Line” (University of Missouri Press, 2007), which won the Kansas State Historical Society’s Edward N. Tihen Award. His other publications include “‘A Pure Son of Missouri’: Freeman Barrows at the Crossroads of the Slaveholding Frontier,” which the Missouri Historical Review published in July 2015, and “The Quantrill Men Reunions: The Border War, Fifty Years On,” which appeared in “Bleeding Kansas, Bleeding Missouri” (University Press of Kansas, 2013). His current interests include the experiences of civilians during the American Civil War, contested memories of that conflict, and the Reconstruction era in the trans-Mississippi West.




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Oct 19th 2015

This course explores the history of Missouri during the Civil War era. It begins with three controversies that resulted from slavery’s expansion into the trans-Mississippi West—the Missouri Compromise, “Bleeding Kansas,” and the Dred Scott ruling—and uses them to explain how Missouri often stood as a flashpoint of national politics. Time and again, Missouri stood near the middle of sectional disputes over the future of slavery and liberty.

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