E.g., Sunday, November 23, 2014
E.g., Sunday, November 23, 2014
E.g., Sunday, November 23, 2014
Oct 26th 2014

This course will give you a perspective on the multiple historical pathways to our present. It builds on Global History Lab, Part 1, but you are welcome to take this course without having taken Part 1. This course begins with a discussion of industrialization during the 1800s, and continues with a close look at the 20th century and current-day globalization. The course themes include economic integration, warfare and conflict, the transformation of the ecological balance, and cultural responses and innovations. To grapple with these themes, we explore first-hand perspectives of historical actors through a collection of texts and images.

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Sep 20th 2014

In this course, you will learn to design the computer architecture of complex modern microprocessors.

10
Average: 10 (1 vote)
Sep 8th 2014

Are we alone? This course introduces core concepts in astronomy, biology, and planetary science that enable the student to speculate scientifically about this profound question and invent their own solar systems.

8
Average: 8 (1 vote)
Oct 31st 2014

This course covers the essential information that every serious programmer needs to know about algorithms and data structures, with emphasis on applications and scientific performance analysis of Java implementations.

7
Average: 7 (1 vote)
Oct 31st 2014

Analytic Combinatorics teaches a calculus that enables precise quantitative predictions of large combinatorial structures. This course introduces the symbolic method to derive functional relations among ordinary, exponential, and multivariate generating functions, and methods in complex analysis for deriving accurate asymptotics from the GF equations.

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Sep 15th 2014

A course driven by 20 practical questions about wireless, web, and the Internet, about how products from companies like Apple, Google, Facebook, Netflix, Amazon, Ericsson, HP, Skype and AT&T work. In this offering, we will cover 7 of the 20 questions, and you will have the opportunity to personalize your own learning experience by choosing which of the versions suits you best.

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Sep 2nd 2014

This course will give you a perspective on the multiple historical pathways to our present. It will be taught in two parts: Part 1 starts on September 2, while Part 2 begins on October 26. Part 1 begins in 1300 AD at the height of the Silk Road, the triumphs of the Mongol Empire, and the spread of one of the most devastating contagions of all time, the Black Death. It examines the emergence of an international system of competitive empires and their effects on trade and exchange. The course will conclude in the middle of the 19th century, at the end of the Age of Revolution.

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Sep 5th 2014

This course covers the essential information that every serious programmer needs to know about algorithms and data structures, with emphasis on applications and scientific performance analysis of Java implementations. Part I covers basic iterable data types, sorting, and searching algorithms.

8
Average: 8 (1 vote)
Sep 5th 2014

This course teaches a calculus that enables precise quantitative predictions of large combinatorial structures. In addition, this course covers generating functions and real asymptotics and then introduces the symbolic method in the context of applications in the analysis of algorithms and basic structures such as permutations, trees, strings, words, and mappings.

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Jun 16th 2014

This course serves as an introduction to the basic principles that govern all aspects of our networked lives. We will learn about companies like Google and technologies like the Internet in a way that requires no mathematics beyond basic algebra.

10
Average: 10 (1 vote)
Jun 1st 2014

An introduction into the historical, psychological, and sociological analysis of organized conflict.

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Mar 1st 2014

Is abortion wrong? Should we eat animals? What is our responsibility to the world’s poor? This course will encourage you to examine your ethical beliefs on topics relevant to the ancient question posed by Socrates: “How am I to live?”

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Mar 20th 2014

The Buddha said that human suffering—ranging from anxiety to sadness to unfulfilled craving—results from not seeing reality clearly. He described a kind of meditation that promises to ease suffering by dispelling illusions about the world and ourselves. What does psychological science say about this diagnosis and prescription—and about the underlying model of the mind?

10
Average: 10 (1 vote)
Sep 22nd 2013

Statistics One is a comprehensive yet friendly introduction to statistics.

6
Average: 6 (2 votes)
Sep 16th 2013

This course will examine the ways in which the world has grown more integrated yet more divided over the past 700 years.

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No sessions available

In this class we will cover the essentials of sociology, to help you better understand your own life and situations far from your experience.

0
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