E.g., Friday, February 12, 2016
E.g., Friday, February 12, 2016
E.g., Friday, February 12, 2016
Self Paced

The Dalai Lama has said that Buddhism and science are deeply compatible and has encouraged Western scholars to critically examine both the meditative practice and Buddhist ideas about the human mind. A number of scientists and philosophers have taken up this challenge. There have been brain scans of meditators and philosophical examinations of Buddhist doctrines. There have even been discussions of Darwin and the Buddha: Do early Buddhist descriptions of the mind, and of the human condition, make particular sense in light of evolutionary psychology?

Average: 6 (6 votes)
Mar 16th 2016

This course covers the essential information that every serious programmer needs to know about algorithms and data structures, with emphasis on applications and scientific performance analysis of Java implementations.

Average: 5.2 (5 votes)
Jan 29th 2016

Learn about bridge design and discover how structural engineering is a creative discipline and art form.

Average: 10 (1 vote)
Jan 22nd 2016

This course covers the essential information that every serious programmer needs to know about algorithms and data structures, with emphasis on applications and scientific performance analysis of Java implementations. Part I covers basic iterable data types, sorting, and searching algorithms.

Average: 7.4 (9 votes)
Nov 6th 2015

Analytic Combinatorics teaches a calculus that enables precise quantitative predictions of large combinatorial structures. This course introduces the symbolic method to derive functional relations among ordinary, exponential, and multivariate generating functions, and methods in complex analysis for deriving accurate asymptotics from the GF equations.

Average: 3.5 (8 votes)
Oct 21st 2015

Learn from people who have helped build better government in challenging settings around the globe, and develop your own ability to analyze and solve similar problems.

No votes yet
Sep 4th 2015

There’s a lot of excitement about Bitcoin, but also a lot of confusion about what Bitcoin is and how it works. We’re offering this course focusing on the computer science behind Bitcoin to help cut through the hype and get to the core of what makes Bitcoin unique.

Average: 10 (2 votes)
Sep 11th 2015

This course teaches a calculus that enables precise quantitative predictions of large combinatorial structures. In addition, this course covers generating functions and real asymptotics and then introduces the symbolic method in the context of applications in the analysis of algorithms and basic structures such as permutations, trees, strings, words, and mappings.

No votes yet
Jun 1st 2015

This course serves as an introduction to the basic principles that govern all aspects of our networked lives. We will learn about companies like Google and technologies like the Internet in a way that requires no mathematics beyond basic algebra.

Average: 10 (2 votes)
May 15th 2015

This course is about writing “science of delivery" case studies that help us understand how practitioners have addressed complex policy or program implementation challenges. It offers an orientation to the research, writing, and ethics of interview-based case study research.

No votes yet
Mar 2nd 2015

This course teaches the fundamentals of Fog Networking, the network architecture that uses one or a collaborative multitude of end-user clients or near-user edge devices to carry out storage, communication, computation, and control in a network. It also teaches the key results in the design of the Internet of Things, including consumer and industrial applications.

Average: 10 (1 vote)
Jan 25th 2015

Across the globe many political leaders and civic groups seek to help their governments work better. They have the will to build change and a vision of a better future for citizens. The challenge is how to deliver on the promises made—how to create new practices, build new institutions, implement new policies, and transform incentives to sustain improvement. This course introduces a way to think about solutions to common, yet difficult delivery challenges.

No votes yet
Oct 26th 2014

This course will give you a perspective on the multiple historical pathways to our present. It builds on Global History Lab, Part 1, but you are welcome to take this course without having taken Part 1. This course begins with a discussion of industrialization during the 1800s, and continues with a close look at the 20th century and current-day globalization. The course themes include economic integration, warfare and conflict, the transformation of the ecological balance, and cultural responses and innovations. To grapple with these themes, we explore first-hand perspectives of historical actors through a collection of texts and images.

No votes yet
Sep 20th 2014

In this course, you will learn to design the computer architecture of complex modern microprocessors.

Average: 7 (4 votes)
Sep 8th 2014

Are we alone? This course introduces core concepts in astronomy, biology, and planetary science that enable the student to speculate scientifically about this profound question and invent their own solar systems.

Average: 8 (1 vote)
Sep 15th 2014

A course driven by 20 practical questions about wireless, web, and the Internet, about how products from companies like Apple, Google, Facebook, Netflix, Amazon, Ericsson, HP, Skype and AT&T work. In this offering, we will cover 7 of the 20 questions, and you will have the opportunity to personalize your own learning experience by choosing which of the versions suits you best.

Average: 10 (1 vote)
Sep 2nd 2014

This course will give you a perspective on the multiple historical pathways to our present. It will be taught in two parts: Part 1 starts on September 2, while Part 2 begins on October 26. Part 1 begins in 1300 AD at the height of the Silk Road, the triumphs of the Mongol Empire, and the spread of one of the most devastating contagions of all time, the Black Death. It examines the emergence of an international system of competitive empires and their effects on trade and exchange. The course will conclude in the middle of the 19th century, at the end of the Age of Revolution.

No votes yet
Jun 1st 2014

An introduction into the historical, psychological, and sociological analysis of organized conflict.

No votes yet
Mar 1st 2014

Is abortion wrong? Should we eat animals? What is our responsibility to the world’s poor? This course will encourage you to examine your ethical beliefs on topics relevant to the ancient question posed by Socrates: “How am I to live?”

Average: 10 (1 vote)
Sep 22nd 2013

Statistics One is a comprehensive yet friendly introduction to statistics.

Average: 7.3 (3 votes)

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