E.g., Wednesday, September 3, 2014
E.g., Wednesday, September 3, 2014
E.g., Wednesday, September 3, 2014
Oct 14th 2014

Are you interested in politics? Do you feel the need to have a clearer understanding of it, beyond the conventional language of media and social networks? Well, this course might provide the help and the stimulus you are looking for.

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Oct 6th 2014

This course will use movies as examples for understanding the philosophical questions regarding human nature, including the following:
What is human nature?
How does the mind relate to the body?
Is there an enduring self?
Are humans independent creatures?
What constitutes an individuals identity?

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Sep 30th 2014

This course will focus on big questions. You will learn how to ask them and how to answer them.

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Sep 15th 2014

This course will introduce you to some of the most important areas of research in contemporary philosophy. Each week a different philosopher will talk you through some of the most important questions and issues in their area of expertise.

6
Average: 6 (2 votes)
Self Paced Course - Start anytime

Occasionalism is commonly understood as a theory that ascribes all causal power to God on the one hand and treats cause-effect relations in nature as occasions indicating the manner of divine creation on the other.

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Sep 2nd 2014

The ability to reason is fundamental to human beings. Whatever the discipline or discourse it is important to be able to distinguish correct reasoning from incorrect reasoning. The consequences of incorrect reasoning can be minor, like getting lost on the way to a birthday party, or more significant, for example launching nuclear missiles at a flock of ducks, or permanently losing contact with a space craft.

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Aug 27th 2014

Learn how philosophy, art, literature, and history shaped the last century and the world today.

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Self Paced Course - Start anytime

Philosophy & the Science of Human Nature pairs central texts from Western philosophical tradition (including works by Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Epictetus, Kant, Mill, Rawls, & Nozick) with recent findings in cognitive science & related fields.

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Jul 21st 2014

This class will engage some of the central questions surrounding the human experience through the medium of film.

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Apr 14th 2014

Learn how to apply mathematical methods to philosophical problems and questions.

9
Average: 9 (1 vote)
Apr 8th 2014

Justice is a critical analysis of classical and contemporary theories of justice, including discussion of present-day applications.

0
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Self Paced Course - Start anytime

The course is designed to be a systematic introduction to aesthetics, and to the various transformations it has undergone since its founding in the 18th century.

0
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Mar 17th 2014

L'objet de ce cours est d'étudier l'articulation entre les prises de position et les théories politiques des philosophes français du XXème siècle et leur philosophie fondamentale, voire leur métaphysique. Le parcours proposé sollicite l'étude de textes entre autres de Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Cavaillès, Weil, Levi-Strauss, Althusser, Foucault, Deleuze, Lévinas, Derrida...

0
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Mar 10th 2014

This is a 3-week instructor-led course that will include a review of ethical principles and a description of an ethical decision-making model for health care professionals.

0
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Feb 13th 2014

China's past, present, and future: through history, geography, philosophies, literature, politics, economics, art, and ecology.

0
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Self Paced Course - Start anytime

Philosophy and the Science of Human Nature pairs central texts from Western philosophical tradition (including works by Plato, Aristotle, Epictetus, Hobbes, Kant, Mill, Rawls, and Nozick) with recent findings in cognitive science and related fields.

0
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Self Paced Course - Start anytime

There is one thing I can be sure of: I am going to die. But what am I to make of that fact? This course will examine a number of issues that arise once we begin to reflect on our mortality. The possibility that death may not actually be the end is considered. Are we, in some sense, immortal? Would immortality be desirable? Also a clearer notion of what it is to die is examined. What does it mean to say that a person has died? What kind of fact is that? And, finally, different attitudes to death are evaluated. Is death an evil? How? Why? Is suicide morally permissible? Is it rational? How should the knowledge that I am going to die affect the way I live my life?

0
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Self Paced Course - Start anytime

This course is intended as an introduction to political philosophy as seen through an examination of some of the major texts and thinkers of the Western political tradition. Three broad themes that are central to understanding political life are focused upon: the polis experience (Plato, Aristotle), the sovereign state (Machiavelli, Hobbes), constitutional government (Locke), and democracy (Rousseau, Tocqueville).

0
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Feb 10th 2014

In this course we will study Plato's ancient art of blowing up your beliefs as you go, to make sure they're built to last. We spend six weeks studying three Platonic dialogues, then two more weeks pondering a pair of footnotes to Plato; that is, we will consider some contemporary manifestations of issues Plato discusses. The more things change, the more they stay the same.

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Jan 27th 2014

This course examines how the idea of "the modern" develops at the end of the 18th century and how being modern (or progressive, or hip) became one of the crucial criteria for understanding and evaluating cultural change during the last two hundred years.

2
Average: 2 (1 vote)

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