E.g., 2016-06-03
E.g., 2016-06-03
E.g., 2016-06-03
Jun 1st 2016

Reading, discussing, and writing about Mary Shelley’s classic novel, Frankenstein; Or, The Modern Prometheus.

Average: 1 (5 votes)
Apr 27th 2016

Explore Shakespeare's plays of young love, Romeo & Juliet and A Midsummer Night’s Dream, to learn what makes them so compelling and magical. This literature and theater course will delve into two wonderful plays of young love, Romeo & Juliet and A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and try to bring alive what makes them so compelling and popular -- as both literature and drama.

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Apr 18th 2016

The MOOC Discover Don Quijote de la Mancha invites you to experience a one-of-a-kind learning adventure! Use strategy and wit to overcome unique challenges, and earn badges representing the greatest knights of all time.

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Apr 18th 2016

Together with the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, Professor Jonathan Bate explores Shakespeare, his works and the world he lived in. William Shakespeare is one of the most famous authors of all time. 2014 marks the 450th anniversary of his birth. His words have inspired and moved people from around the globe for centuries.

Average: 8.2 (5 votes)
Apr 11th 2016

From small farms to urban neighborhoods, from the region itself to the more distant worlds of the southern diaspora, we discover the stories, music, and art of the American South.

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Apr 1st 2016

Reading, discussing, and writing about Charles Dickens’ classic novella, “A Christmas Carol.” This course will explore in depth Charles Dickens’ 1843 novella, “A Christmas Carol,” which has an important place in English language literature. It has given us enduring characters, such as Scrooge and Tiny Tim, and common sayings, like “Bah! Humbug!”. Whether you celebrate Christmas or not, you will find that this book offers important themes, including generosity, poverty, and social injustice.

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Apr 1st 2016

Reading, discussing, and writing about Oscar Wilde’s classic novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray.

Average: 2.8 (4 votes)
Mar 29th 2016

This course is about the pleasures of poetry, with plenty of specific examples. The underlying principle is: The more you know about an art, the more pleasure you will find in it. Poetry lives in any reader, not necessarily in performance by the poet or a trained actor. The pleasure of actually saying a poem, or even saying it in your imagination—your mind’s ear—is essential.

Average: 10 (1 vote)
Mar 28th 2016

Learn new ways of interpreting literary texts, from time-tested methods to computer-assisted practices such as distant reading. As we make sense of what we read, we construe meaning using the ancient cultural technique of interpretation. Only rarely do we actually reflect this process: what are the means that help us to understand literary texts? How does interpretation work? And how has our increasing use of e-books and tablets changed the way we read and interpret literature?

Average: 5 (3 votes)
Mar 15th 2016

Jorge Luis Borges, the great Argentine writer, said that no one should deny themselves the pleasure of reading Dante's Divine Comedy. In this course, you will discover precisely what Borges meant.

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Mar 1st 2016

Reading, discussing, and writing about the novel The Call of the Wild, written by Jack London.

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Feb 22nd 2016

Explore how Othello has been performed and interpreted, from its original staging to the modern day, with this free online course.

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Feb 16th 2016

Explore the writings of famous American authors from Ralph Waldo Emerson and Harriet Beecher Stowe to Mark Twain, and examine the historic role Dartmouth College played in their formation.

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Feb 1st 2016

Find out how poems, plays and novels can help us understand and cope with deep emotional strain in this free online course.

Average: 6.7 (3 votes)
Jan 25th 2016

Celebrate Burns Night online, and dig deeper into the life and works of Robert Burns, with this free University of Glasgow course.

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Jan 4th 2016

Reading, discussing, and writing about Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel Jane Eyre.

Average: 5.3 (9 votes)
Nov 2nd 2015

Reading, discussing, and writing about Jane Austen’s 1813 novel of manners, Pride and Prejudice.

Average: 4 (3 votes)
Nov 2nd 2015

The study of literary texts can be dramatically enriched if one takes into account the material form in which they are presented to the reader: print or non-print, book or magazine, manuscript or film adaptation, etc. In this course, we will focus on the relationships between text and medium, more precisely between the text and the other elements that may surround it (like illustrations) or between the text and the various material forms that shape it (like the digital hypertext format).

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Oct 2nd 2015

Reading, discussing, and writing about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s mystery classic, A Study in Scarlet.

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Sep 21st 2015 - Self-Paced

Go behind the scenes at Harvard’s libraries to discover how readers in the first information age interacted with their books.

Average: 9 (2 votes)

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