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Feb 20th 2017

Part 2 of 2. This course depicts the complex history of the Holocaust, highlighting its impact on our world today. The Holocaust was an inconceivable historical event, which forever robbed Western culture of its innocence. As civilized human beings, we fail to understand how events of such horror could have taken place, and how an idea so inhumanly warped could have spread like wildfire through an entire continent, instigating the systematic annihilation of millions of Jews.

Average: 5.2 (5 votes)
Feb 20th 2017

Explore psychological research to understand basic theories and methods of scientific psychology with a strong focus on positive psychology. As the physical quality of life improves in our increasingly global and technologically focused world, it is particularly important to focus on psychology. In fact, psychology is one of the most popular subjects studied in universities by students across the globe, and there is an increasing interest in studying this fascinating- and constantly changing- field.

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Jan 23rd 2017

Ce cours propose une introduction à la protection internationale des droits de l’homme. Il en présente les sources, les catégories, le contenu et les limites qui leur sont opposables, ainsi que les obligations qu’ils génèrent à la charge des Etats. Il expose aussi les principaux mécanismes de mise en œuvre prévus au niveau universel et régional pour assurer leur respect.

Average: 7.5 (2 votes)
Jan 23rd 2017

This course provides a view of the history of spaceflight, from early writings telling of human's fascination of space through the early Russian and American space stations. Developed as an interesting and entertaining slice of space history that is accessible to anyone with an interest in human spaceflight

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Jan 23rd 2017

We live in a complex world with diverse people, firms, and governments whose behaviors aggregate to produce novel, unexpected phenomena. We see political uprisings, market crashes, and a never ending array of social trends. How do we make sense of it? Models. Evidence shows that people who think with models consistently outperform those who don't. And, moreover people who think with lots of models outperform people who use only one. Why do models make us better thinkers? Models help us to better organize information - to make sense of that fire hose or hairball of data (choose your metaphor) available on the Internet.

Average: 10 (3 votes)
Jan 23rd 2017

Arts and culture leaders have a rewarding but tough task: creating sustainable organizations that deliver real social value. There is a lot of competition out there. Being an effective leader means constantly adapting, cleverly using the best tools to reach as many people as possible. This course is designed to help leaders at any level do just that.

Average: 10 (1 vote)
Jan 23rd 2017

We are so pleased to have you join us as we investigate this crucial topic. Violence is a leading cause of death, disability and health care use worldwide. Violence is a complex problem and can only be understood and reduced though a multidisciplinary approach. The course will cover patterns of violence including sexual violence; biological, psychological, and social causes (e.g., economic deprivation, religious factors); specific types of violence; how media and the arts portray violence; the economic impact of violence; physical and mental consequences; and ways to control and prevent violence in our communities.

Average: 9 (1 vote)
Jan 23rd 2017

How did the State of Israel come to be? How is it that an idea, introduced in 19th century Europe, became a reality? And how does that reality prevail in the harsh complexities of the Middle East? Presented by Professor Eyal Naveh, with additional units from Professor Asher Sussers' "The Emergence of the Modern Middle East" course, This course will take you on a journey through the history of Modern Israel.

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Jan 23rd 2017

The Modern Civil Rights Movement is a significant landmark in United States history. This movement was a struggle for human rights directly challenging the nation to extend its democratic principles to African Americans and all peoples. This course sheds light on the often overlooked strategic planning that supported the direction of the events and is told by a voice intimately involved in the organization of movement—Dr. Bernard LaFayette, Jr. Topics include the history of the campaigns, the different coalitions and groups, philosophy and methods of nonviolent direct action, and the contemporary application of nonviolent conflict transformation. The course hosts several guest speakers, including Andrew Young, Reverend C.T. Vivian, Henry "Hank" Thomas, and Constance Curry.

Average: 1 (1 vote)
Jan 23rd 2017

This course analyzes the intersection between the Olympic Games and the media and how television and other media contribute to fund, shape and disseminate the major sporting spectacle in the world: the Olympic Games.

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Jan 23rd 2017

Effective altruism is built on the simple but unsettling idea that living a fully ethical life involves doing the most good one can. In this course you will examine this idea's philosophical underpinnings; meet remarkable people who have restructured their lives in accordance with it; and think about how effective altruism can be put into practice in your own life.

Average: 8 (1 vote)
Jan 23rd 2017

Discover what shapes how we talk about schools today by exploring the history of U.S. education reform. Engage with the main actors, key decisions, and major turning points in this history. See how social forces drive reform. Learn about how the critical tensions embedded in U.S. education policy and practice apply to schools nationally, globally— and where you live.

Average: 5.7 (3 votes)
Jan 23rd 2017

An introductory yet trenchant exploration of select Chinese classic texts that cover the domains of classical literature, history, philosophy, and fine arts.

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Jan 23rd 2017

The Holocaust was an inconceivable historical event, which forever robbed Western culture of its innocence. As civilized human beings, we fail to understand how events of such horror could have taken place, and how an idea so inhumanly warped could have spread like wildfire through an entire continent, instigating the systematic annihilation of millions of Jews.

No votes yet
Jan 23rd 2017

What is philosophy? How does it differ from science, religion, and other modes of human discourse? This course traces the origins of philosophy in the Western tradition in the thinkers of Ancient Greece. We begin with the Presocratic natural philosophers who were active in Ionia in the 6th century BCE and are also credited with being the first scientists.

Average: 7.5 (4 votes)
Jan 23rd 2017

In this course we will discuss the history of some ideas that have been hugely influential in the modern west and that were taken out to the rest of the world. The discussion centers on an extraordinary and historically important figure, a sixteenth century German man named Martin Luther. Luther is recognized today as the originator of many of the most significant ideas that continue to affect and shape who we as modern people are and how we see the world and ourselves for better and for worse.

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Jan 23rd 2017

Myths are traditional stories that have endured over a long time. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths.

Average: 8 (2 votes)
Jan 23rd 2017

What is our role in the universe as human agents capable of knowledge? What makes us intelligent cognitive agents seemingly endowed with consciousness? This is the second part of the course 'Philosophy and the Sciences', dedicated to Philosophy of the Cognitive Sciences. Scientific research across the cognitive sciences has raised pressing questions for philosophers. The goal of this course is to introduce you to some of the main areas and topics at the key juncture between philosophy and the cognitive sciences.

Average: 9.5 (2 votes)
Jan 23rd 2017

This course uses the lives, ideals and achievements of Theodore, Franklin, and Eleanor Roosevelt to create the idea of a Rooseveltian century. It is about doing research, analyzing primary sources, and connecting all this information with a coherent and logical interpretation. It is an invitation to think critically and historically, and it wants to give you a glimpse of what it means to be a historian at work.

Average: 9.8 (4 votes)
Jan 23rd 2017

Archaeology has as its objective the recovery and revival of humankind past, and as its aim the rescue and preservation of cultural heritage. Archaeology is, among human sciences, the discipline with the strongest importance for the rediscovery, but also for the preservation and protection of cultural heritage, as Humankind’s universal patrimony. You will be introduced to the way we ourselves reflect on and are engaged with the study of human past: from the practical and material recovery of ancient traces in the field to the study and interpretation. On the other hand, the discovery of human past implies the correct conservation and presentation for both experts and general public: the study and protection of the past we share every day prevent from any possible destruction, misuse, abuse and thus cancellation of human memory.

Average: 7.5 (2 votes)

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