E.g., 2016-06-30
E.g., 2016-06-30
E.g., 2016-06-30
Aug 14th 2016

This course presents some important vignettes of a complex, highly diverse India that is also witnessing unprecedented changes since its formal independence in 1947 from Great Britain. The lectures revolve around social dimensions of change, the continuing influence of ancient texts on contemporary India, political democracy, economic transition from the state to the market, gender relations, India's economic globalisation and changing world view.

Average: 10 (1 vote)
Jul 5th 2016

Learn about the rich diversity of Hindu sacred texts – hymns, narratives, philosophical thought – and their interpretations. Ever wondered about the sacred scriptures that have sustained for millennia one of the oldest and most diverse religions of the world - Hinduism? Want to discover the lessons this history may offer mankind in the 21st century?

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Jul 4th 2016

This course provides an overview of Thomas Jefferson's work and perspectives presented by the University of Virginia in partnership with Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello. Together, UVA and Monticello are recognized internationally as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Average: 8 (1 vote)
Jul 4th 2016

Gain an introductory understanding of evolution, including how we evolved from primates and became human. Impressively, humans are the only creatures produced by evolution that are capable of understanding evolution. In Becoming Human: Anthropology, you can explore how evolution works and how variation arises. Find out why, of all the orders of life, primates produced us. How did apes start to look like us, walk on two feet and grow big brains that over the past 200,000 years have figured out where we came from? This subject will give you some thought-provoking answers.

Average: 7.9 (8 votes)
Jul 4th 2016

Sociology examines individuals in their social contexts. Sociology examines individuals in their social contexts and provides insights into factors such as class, gender and age shape societies at the individual and institutional levels. This introductory course introduces you to key concepts and theories used in examination of and for understanding social action, social institutions, social structure and social change. This course seeks to introduce you to some of sociology’s central concepts, that describe and analyse critically the social forces shaping human behavior and attitude in contemporary social life.

Average: 6.6 (5 votes)
Jul 4th 2016

The level of popularity you experienced in childhood and adolescence is still affecting you today in ways that you may not even realize. Learn about how psychologists study popularity and how these same concepts can be used in adulthood to be more successful at work, become better parents, and have a happier life.

Average: 7.3 (6 votes)
Jul 4th 2016

Explore the history of China’s language and culture and its adjustment to an increasingly globalised world. This course provides you with insights into the rich fabric of the cultures of China. You will develop a basic understanding of written Chinese, its history and expression in calligraphy. We will also explore the origins and variety of Chinese cuisine, the role of food in festivals and the etiquette of Chinese dining and tea drinking. You will also look at the origins of some of the values that underpin Chinese society and how these are being affected by economic development and urbanisation. You will uncover some of the symbolism of numbers and colours and the Chinese Zodiac and get a feel for how traditional values and beliefs are expressed in Chinese opera and architecture.

Average: 6.2 (12 votes)
Jul 4th 2016

Learn about how the world’s oceans are regulated, protected and preserved. This course considers the nature of how the world’s oceans are regulated. It will go through how ocean governance has evolved through time and how it actually works. In addition, there will be a focus on particular issues such as piracy, maritime security and environmental protection for the oceans.

Average: 4.8 (6 votes)
Jul 4th 2016

Explores Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Māori history, society, culture, language and demography. In this course we build the distinctive stories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia and Māori people in Aotearoa New Zealand over four modules. Our aim is to provide you with an understanding of our past and present realities. In the first module we overview the arrival of both Māori and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and settlement in our lands, exploring our respective culture and societies. In the 2nd module we detail the period of colonisation for both peoples, from the first European claims of discovery and ownership to establishment of Colonial Governments, the frontier wars and the disruption to our traditional societies and ways of life and the colonial containment practices that followed.

Average: 6.6 (7 votes)
Jul 4th 2016

Discover a world of music exploring your community or family to learn how music represents cultural identity. The objective of the course is to stimulate you to become a cultural explorer in your own community by discovering music traditions outside the normal day-to-day music heard on mass media. In the event that your community is small with minimum diversity then you are encouraged to explore your own cultural family heritage. Each module will build the your listening skills using the basic musical elements of Rhythm, Melody, Harmony, Texture and Dynamics progressively. This is to aid you in listening and analysing the cultural musics used in the course. Each module includes basic musical, cultural and ethnomusicological concepts.

Average: 4.9 (7 votes)
Jul 4th 2016

In this course aspiring writers will be introduced to perhaps the most elemental and often the most challenging element of story: plot. We will learn what keeps it moving, how it manipulates our feelings, expectations, and desires. We will examine the choices storytellers make to snag our imaginations, drag them into a fictional world, and keep them there. We will learn how to outline and structure a plot, discuss narrative arc, pacing and reversals and reveal the inevitable surprise: connecting the beginning, middle and end.

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Jul 4th 2016

This is a survey of modern history from a global perspective. Part Two begins early in the twentieth century, as older ways of doing things and habits of thought give way. What follows is an era of cataclysmic struggles over what ideas and institutions will take their place.

Average: 4.3 (3 votes)
Jul 4th 2016

Discover just some of the ways that heroism and the First World War is portrayed through art and film. The centenary of the First World War is a time for reflection and exploration. In this short course you will discover just some of the ways that heroism is portrayed through art and film.

Average: 5.4 (8 votes)
Jul 4th 2016

This is a survey of modern history from a global perspective. Part One begins with the political and economic revolutions of the late 1700s and tracks the transformation of the world during the 1800s. Part One concludes as these bewildering changes seem to be running beyond the capacity of older institutions to handle them. Throughout the course we try to grasp what is happening and ask: Why? And the answers often turn on very human choices.

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Jul 4th 2016

Often called “the cornerstone” of public health, epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of diseases, health conditions, or events among populations and the application of that study to control health problems. By applying the concepts learned in this course to current public health problems and issues, students will understand the practice of epidemiology as it relates to real life and makes for a better appreciation of public health programs and policies. This course explores public health issues like cardiovascular and infectious diseases – both locally and globally – through the lens of epidemiology.

Average: 5.7 (6 votes)
Jul 4th 2016

A unique and exciting introduction to the genre and craft of historical fiction, for curious students, aspiring authors--anyone with a passion for the past. Read classics of the genre, encounter bestselling writers of historical fiction, and discover your own historical archive while interacting with a global community of interested readers.

Average: 2.5 (2 votes)
Jul 4th 2016

In this course we will study Plato's ancient art of blowing up your beliefs as you go, to make sure they're built to last. We spend six weeks studying three Platonic dialogues, then two more weeks pondering a pair of footnotes to Plato; that is, we will consider some contemporary manifestations of issues Plato discusses. Our focus will be: moral theory and moral psychology.

Average: 4 (1 vote)
Jul 4th 2016

Learn to understand criminal behaviour by looking at our evolutionary history and animal behaviour in general. Criminologists, like scientists generally, agree that life resulted from a process of natural selection. But most do not use that information when studying what crime is and why it exists. In this subject, you will learn the process of natural selection and how it can be used to make sense of criminal behaviour. We will use the theory of evolution to make sense of a broad range of crimes including several types of homicide, child abuse and neglect, spousal assault and group level aggression such as warfare, hooliganism, rioting, and gang fights.

Average: 5.4 (8 votes)
Jul 4th 2016

Tibetan Buddhist Meditation and the Modern World explores the immense variety of meditation practices past and present. We present their histories, their philosophical underpinnings, their transformations in the modern global world, and we give you a chance to reflect upon meditation practices through secular contemplations designed just for this course.

Average: 6.6 (5 votes)
Jul 4th 2016

Explore Japanese philosophy and get a sense of Asian culture with this free online course. Thanks to the impact of ‘globalisation’ people in the West are growing more and more interested in voices from East Asian culture. But familiarity with Western philosophy doesn’t always mean an accurate understanding of its Asian counterpart.

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